Internet Myth #3: The Key to Great Performance? Lax Security!

Team Teridion

Welcome to the third posting of Teridion’s weekly series debunking Internet performance myths. This week’s myth is: “The key to great Internet performance? Lax security!”

Reality: There are ways to optimize Internet performance while keeping data secure & encrypted.

A common inquiry from our customers is how to achieve high-speed Internet performance while ensuring secure content delivery to their end users. Internet overlay networks can provide a way to do just that. One type of overlay network is a Content Delivery Network, or CDN. It improves the user experience by moving certain web operations closer to the end user and caching unencrypted content in many locations globally. This regional content caching approach is known as a “stateful” overlay network. This method has low risk for static, publicly available content such as public images and videos. However, if security is a concern, a CDN is arguably a risky solution, as any user with permissions on a CDN server can access, replace or destroy content.

A second type of overlay networks, known as “stateless”, store no sensitive content on edge nodes. There are two types of stateless overlay networks.

SSL offload networks handle SSL handshakes for the origin server, offloading processing overhead, but require the origin web site to share SSL keys.
Edge routing based networks handle TCP termination and optimize routing to the origin server without requiring SSL certificates.

One example of an edge routing solution is Teridion. The Teridion Kumo-X accelerates both dynamic and static content across the Internet without compromising security. The recent CloudBleed bug with Cloudflare showed the potential risk of having confidential information stored in third party caches.

Learn more about optimizing end-to-end Internet throughput:

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